Community Reinforcement Approach (Tentative)

The Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) is a psychosocial intervention for individuals with alcohol and other drug use disorders that has been adapted for several populations.  In the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA), clinicians and patients work collaboratively on identifying individual goals, and conducting a functional analysis of substance use (i.e., taking a closer look at the function served by the use of substances), and a functional analysis of healthy social behaviors (i.e., sober activities).

During the treatment, the patient learns practical skills to meet his or her goals including communication, problem solving, and assertive drink and drug refusal (i.e., effective ways to comfortably handle direct and indirect pressure to drink or use drugs). Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) may also incorporate job-hunting skills, and social or recreational counseling to identify sober activities. The CRA clinician is likely to take an active role in the treatment, including role playing, to help the patient learn and practice skills, and encouraging him/her to sample new activities.

Educational Objectives

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the tools needed to develop and build on their own skills in working with clients, while using a CRA approach and principles.
  • Utilize existing knowledge in relation to CRA.
  • Enhance confidence while working with clients who are experiencing addiction while using CRA.
  • Describe the theory and principles of CRA.
  • Practice CRA and explore the skills associated with working with people using CRA tools and skills. 

Available Continuing Education: 4.5 hours

DMH – Addiction Therapist

DMH – Mental Health Therapist

DMH – Licensed Administrator

MAAP – Mississippi Association of Addiction Professionals

SW-Social Work

Cost

$25

Presenter

To Be Determined

Location

MSPHI

Date

Aug. 17, 2020

Time

9:00 am - 3:30 pm

Cost

$25

Presenter

To Be Determined

Location

MSPHI